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BLOGical Thoughts Archive

April 2010

Friday, 30 April 2010

I went against my own advice and downloaded Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx last night. I used a Belgian download site to do it, since it was 3am there and I figured the traffic would be lighter. It took a couple of hours to download the ISO image, and I burned a CD from it this morning. I will create a VM from the disk today. Over the weekend I will install it on my laptop.


 

There is supposed to be a Dutch oven workshop in Rathdrum tomorrow, timed to coincide with the seasonal opening of the Farmer's Market there. I say 'supposed' because I volunteered for it several months ago and I have heard nothing about it since. I will pack up all my Dutch ovens and go over there, hoping I am welcome.


 

I am planning an update to gdvdslides, but it will take a while. I hope to include all the logic in dvd-slideshow within gdvdslides, so that script will no longer be a prerequisite for running gdvdslides. I also plan to 'normalize' the program, so it will look more like a Gnome application.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Thursday, 29 April 2010

Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx goes live today. You should be able to download an ISO image of the disk from the Ubuntu web site. I would suggest, however, waiting until next week to do that, to allow the excitement about the new version to settle down. In the meantime, I will continue to provide links to relevant articles here, so you can keep current on Canonical's latest distribution.


 

I have been looking for a slab saw and a lap for my lapidary efforts. Last night, a North Idaho Mineral Club member called me and told me a member of the Spokane Rock Rollers was selling all his equipment. I gave him a call and he has both the items I was looking for, at a very reasonable price.

Tomorrow at noon, I will go over to his house and look at the equipment. If they are okay, I will give him a check and load the equipment on my truck. That means I will have to drag someone from work with me, as the slab saw will be pretty heavy and the guy is selling all of it because of ill health. I will then be able to cut some of the material I have acquired since getting back in to lapidary.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Wednesday, 28 April 2010

I apologize for all the Ubuntu/Canonical links below, but this is because Ubuntu 10.04 will be released in the next couple of days. It is the very public face of Linux at this point and will receive much attention because of that.

The bad choices being made by Canonical seem to be multiplying. Canonical has now announced they will include a global menu in 10.10, much like the Apple OS/X global menu. How is that innovative? Apple has been using it since 1984. How is it more efficient? Why should we continue to upgrade past 10.04? I'd really like to know the answers to these questions. And put the windows controls back on the upper right corner, Mark - far away from other frequently used controls.

In the meantime, for those of you who will be upgrading to 10.04, you can find and download Ubuntu Tweak. Apart from doing all kinds of other things, this program will allow you to change the windows controls back to the upper right.


 

I finished the SQL translator I was coding at work and I am now working on the data analyzer. This is the piece that tweaks the data objects that get sent to the SQL translator, so it can understand them. I think I may have inadvertently been sucked into the manager core cadre, those folks who never see the light of day and work on code that never manifests itself directly to the user. Oh well, it pays the bills.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Tuesday, 27 April 2010

The book I got at LinuxFest Northwest was a book on Drupal, a Content Management Framework for building web sites. I already use Drupal on another web site and I will be using it on the North Idaho Mineral Club web site. I want to set that web site up properly, so I am reading the book and learning how to set it up the way I want.

Drupal is not like WordPress; it is modular and you just plug in the things you want to add. If you need a web forum or a user poll, just plug in the module. This makes it very powerful, but it is also hard to learn how to use it. Which is why I have the book.


 

I was thinking that there were almost no sessions at LinuxFest Northwest on how to program for Linux. I think that would be a good topic for a session, and I may volunteer next year to present a session on "Rapid Application Development in Linux with Lazarus". That is kind of a low-key development environment. You don't see much about it and it needs more exposure. Since I have 15 years experience with Delphi (on which Lazarus was modeled) and have written gdvdslides in Lazarus, I figure I have enough experience to present the session.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Monday, 26 April 2010

I have two GPS units for my cars. The TomTom GPS is in my Honda Civic and it works like a charm. I never have any problems at all with it. It uses Linux as its base operating system.

The Mio is in my Dodge and I have nothing but trouble with it. These problems range from not turning off, not turning on and completely locking up every time I drive through Ellensburg, WA. I keep having to reset the device to get around these problems. Guess what operating system it uses?

When you reset the device, some of the settings get reset, too. Like the route planning information, such as route type (gets set to speed instead of economy) and the allowed roads (regular highways not allowed).

The major problem with the unit is trip planning. When you select a destination it does that just fine. If you are part of the way to your destination and then change your destination, it allows you to do that, too. The only problem is, it is still trying to take you to your original destination. There is absolutely no indication it decided to ignore your new destination. You have to cancel the first trip, then add the second one. The unit is one of those Windows CE "we know better than you what you want to do" devices.


 

Why did I bring up the problem with that idiot Mio device? Because over the weekend, I went to LinuxFest Northwest in Bellingham, WA. I left after work and drove to Carnation, WA to impose on some friends to let me stay the night on their spread. They weren't home, so I started to go on to Bellingham. I ended up right back at Carnation because of that stinking GPS. I stayed in a small park next to the river and the next morning, I started out for Bellingham again. The GPS insisted the only way to get there was to go south to I-90, then over to I-5 and up. It refused to recognize that highway 2 goes from Monroe directly over to I-5 and I would have saved another 40 or 50 miles (no highways allowed after reset, remember?)

Despite my difficulties with a Microsoft device, I did have a good time at the conference. I got a book and a T-shirt, too. I learned a lot about the Drupal Content Management Framework and got to see the vastly overrated iPad. I didn't win anything at the raffle, though. I really would have liked to have won the main prize, which was a quad-CPU PC with 16GB or RAM, a fancy Nvidia video card and a 1 terabyte hard drive. Oh well, maybe next year.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Friday, 23 April 2010

The program class I finished at work was code reviewed with two of my co-workers, and I picked up some valuable suggestions. One of them is that the routine I wrote for building the FROM clause of the SQL statement is not comprehensive enough. I built it to use two layers of input information, because all the examples I was given showed only two layers. There will actually be more than two layers.

So this morning I will be rewriting the routine as a recursive routine, i.e., a routine that calls itself. It keeps calling itself until it reaches the bottom layer, then it builds the portion for that layer and passes it up to the next layer. It keeps doing that until it hits the top layer, at which point the WHERE clause should be complete.

I have used recursion before, but I don't think I've ever done it on a commercial product. This should be interesting.

I also have to do something about preventing SQL injection attacks. This is when a user adds stuff to the information request that causes the request to dump the entire data set instead of the portion that was originally requested. This happens to web sites and it is how user information is gathered. That is, unless the programmer prevents it.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Thursday, 22 April 2010

I went to another auction a couple of weeks back, and I picked up a box of cast iron cooking items. Among the items was a Lodge 8 waffle iron, an unmarked 10" indoor Dutch oven and a Wagner griddle. I think I got my money's worth. Here is the griddle:

As you can see, it's easy to tell that the griddle is from Wagner. I need to clean it up, of course. There must be 40 years of cruft attached to it. Here is the waffle iron:

Note that the ring it came with is too big for the iron (that kind of thing happens in an auction). I am looking for a smaller ring, but I don't know if I will be successful.

The auctions are a lot of fun, but I will not be attending them on a regular basis, as they are too tempting and I have enough junk at home.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Wednesday, 21 April 2010

The guy who sits in the office across the hall from me at work recently entered Wired Magazine's $10,000 Media Room Makeover contest. He created two videos as his entry: part 1 and part 2. After all was said and done, he won the contest!

The Wired folks came to his house in Post Falls from somewhere on the East Coast and made over his media room last Monday. He now has a 50" widescreen LCD TV and all kinds of other new equipment. He is making a video of the installation, so when he posts it, I will let you all know. Congratulations, Brandon!

I don't know if you can tell, but he does multimedia stuff for us - he designs GUI components and layouts. He is very good at it, too.


 

I haven't mentioned what I've been doing at work. They assigned me to work on some stuff that is part of our manager program. That was a little scary, as I haven't done any work on the manager before. Mostly, I have been working on peripheral pieces and standalone programs that interact with our system.

We are building an in-house tool to do data searches. Currently, we interface to an outside party's tool, and our relations with that party are cooling rapidly. We want to be able to do the searches without the third party.

We want to be able to search both the raw data that comes in to the manager, and normalized data that is stored by the manager in our database. My job is to create a translator that will take the search requirements and produce a complex SQL statement that will be sent to the database server. Sounds easy, right? Wrong. There are all kinds of technical gotchas in that.

Despite my own doubts of whether I could do it, I completed the translator and spent all day yesterday testing and fixing bugs in it. It is now complete and I am proud of the SQL it turns out. Very classy.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Tuesday, 20 April 2010

I did some more with my DVR last night. I verified it could rip CDs and play them back. I also verified it could rip a home-made video DVD, but it is having trouble finding that DVD, so I can't play it back.

I have emailed a friend about my problems with importing encoded DVDs, but he hasn't answered back yet. I will continue to work on this and see if I can get it to not only import encoded DVDs, but actually play the import DVDs back.


 

Blast From The Past: My first computer program. I wrote it by marking the machine language instructions on empty punch cards with a pencil. I then ran the cards through a mark-sense machine and it read the marks and punched the holes. When that was done I ran the cards through the computer to get an answer. I don't even remember what the question was, but the computer was an IBM 1620. It was a decimal (not binary) machine and it didn't know how to multiply. There was a table in memory that allowed it to do multiplication. It was big and it was slow. The next semester, the school got an IBM 1130, which was a much better machine. I did most my high-order language programming on that machine.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Monday, 19 April 2010

I built my own digital video recorder over the weekend. The hardware was harder to assemble than usual, because the case was much smaller than usual. I had to remove the case top, remove the front panel, remove the peripheral rack and remove the power supply, so I could install the motherboard.

I then re-installed the power supply. The hard disk went underneath the peripheral rack and the DVD drive went on top of the peripheral rack. I then re-install the rack. After I had everything all zipped up, I powered up into the BIOS and checked everything. The BIOS could not see the hard drive, so I had to power down, remove the case top, front panel and peripheral rack to find that I had not plugged the hard drive power cable in all the way. I put it all back and tried the BIOS again. This time it found everything.

Next I installed Mythbuntu version 9.10. This is fairly straightforward until you get to the MythTV portion. From what I learned a week ago at the user group meeting, I was able to get through that with minor problems.

I have had problems with the installation, though. I can't import an encoded DVD right now. I can import an unencoded DVD, but the import process always fails about 2/3 of the way through. I'm not sure if that is the DVD or the DVD drive, but something isn't working right.

The DVR can record TV programs and will present them back to me for viewing. I object to the menu system that MythTV uses, as it is hierarchical with no indication of where you are in the hierarchy. A simple line at the top of the screen showing that would help immensely.

I have taken pictures of most of the install and will post them when I get a chance.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Friday, 16 April 2010

When I came home from the North Idaho Mineral Club meeting last night, there were three packages waiting for me. One contained a remote control for my digital video recorder (DVR), one contained the computer case and one contained the motherboard, memory, DVD drive and hard disk. The box with the computer case was actually smaller than the one with all the parts. This is going to be the smallest computer I have ever built.

I am going to take pictures of the construction of this DVR as I go, including the software installation. Construction should start tomorrow, subject to how much I get done at work today (we have a hot project going that should be done by Monday).


 

The mineral club meeting was very interesting. A geologist gave us a presentation of gold mining in Alaska. He brought lots of slides and some gold samples he had acquired at the time. From what I saw of his samples, at current prices he must have had about $10,000 in gold nuggets and fine gold with him. Nice if you can find it.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Thursday, 15 April 2010

As a test, I installed Ubuntu 10.04 on the older computer that I had put Mythbuntu on, then I installed MythTV on it. I did that because I wanted to ensure that a remote MythTV from my workstation could work with the MythTV back-end on that machine.

The test failed. Instead of having a database connection to the wrong version, I now have no database connection at all. This is all too weird for words. I should be able to figure what wrong, though. After all, it's only a database conection.

Well, I'm going to shelve this until the new hardware shows up. Tonight I'm going to a North Idaho Mineral Club meeting and talk about rocks.


 

Update: I forgot to wish everyone a happy Tax Day.

 


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

Wednesday, 14 April 2010

I uninstalled the MythTV front-end from this workstation, so I could reinstall it from the MythTV web site. That way, the front-end on this computer would be able to talk to the back-end on the Mythbuntu box I created over the weekend.

The installation from MythTV was weird. They actually pointed me at the Mythbuntu web site, and I downloaded a MythTV control center from there. I used that to install only the front-end on this workstation. It was an unusual install, but it all went perfectly.

What did not go perfectly was the front-end on this workstation trying to connect to the back-end on the Mythbuntu box. According to the log I looked at, the connection went fine, but there is a version mismatch between the workstation front-end and the Mythbuntu back-end. I don't know how that can be, but it is.

So, when the new hardware shows up, here's my solution to this problem: Install Ubuntu 10.04 on the new box, then install MythTV from the exact same source I used to install the front-end on this workstation. That should take care of any mismatches.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Tuesday, 13 April 2010

I was out late last night, doing the Dutch oven demo for a Boy Scout troop in Post Falls. The demo went fairly well; I don't think I bored anyone and the pizza I baked was a huge hit. It turns out the troop leader is also looking for some help at an event in August, so I guess I will pass this along to George Holcomb in Rathdrum. He is the organizer of Dutch oven events in this area, and he used to be a scoutmaster, too.


 

I installed the MythTV front-end on this workstation, so it could talk to the MythTV I installed over the weekend. They would not talk to each other, as the version I installed when I installed Mythbuntu is newer than the version that is in the Ubuntu repositories. I had to uninstall the front-end from this workstation and I will be looking for a way to install the latest front-end from a MythTV web site download.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

Monday, 12 April 2010

The talk about MythTV at the North Idaho Linux Users Group meeting on Saturday was very successful. Frank Ten Thy installed the program on a computer by installing the Mythbuntu distribution. He then set up the program to receive TV signals from an HDHomeRun tuner. It all worked very well and the talk was very inspiring. It was so interesting the talk ended up taking most of the meeting.

Frank then powered up his real Mythbuntu box, which he uses at home as a personal video recorder (PVR). He showed us how he has recorded television shows and movies on the box and how well it plays them back. He even demonstrated a remote control for the computer, as MythTV supports all kinds of remote controls.

Since the talk was so inspiring and since I also have an HDHomeRun tuner I have not been using, I went home after the meeting and installed Mythbuntu on an old Compaq desktop I had laying around. It all works well and I even recorded a movie off of channel 28-2 for viewing later. I have two problems using the old machine, though - the Ethernet connection speed and sound.

Instead of creating a video signal with the information it gets from my TV antenna, the HDHomeRun tuner sends the information to my local area network. It does this at a 1 gigabit rate. The old computer I am using as a PVR only has a 100 megabit Ethernet connection. This causes jitter and slight pauses in the captured video.

As for sound, I have installed Linux on the Compaq before and not had a problem, but it seems that Mythbuntu (based on Ubuntu 9.10) does not like the sound setup on that machine. So even though I have recorded a movie on it, I do not know if the movie had sound recorded with it. I assume that it did.

Since MythTV works for me and I really need a more modern computer to use as a PVR, I am going to build one. I will also look into how the MythTV box can serve up video to other computers on the LAN. Look for more on this in the future.


 

The install of Ubuntu 10.04 on my laptop went bad for some reason and I had to reinstall it. I think I will wait for the actual release disk on April 29 before I look at this new version of Ubuntu again.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Friday, 9 April 2010

Canonical has released the second beta of Ubuntu 10.04 (Lucid Lynx). When I attempted to download it last night, the first time I got within 10 minutes of finishing and the high winds here knocked my power off-line. So I did it again, then burned a CD from the download. That burned up a couple of hours, so I finished installing the distro on my laptop about 10:30pm last night.

One of the main reasons I completely reinstalled from beta 1 is so I could try out a command line upgrade script I linked to yesterday. I have to say that the upgrade script worked really well.

Basically, the script does most of the stuff I end up doing after installing a new Ubuntu version. It installs the latest updates, codecs, web browser plugins, GIMP, VLC,Thunderbird, Wine, Mplayer and, most importantly it installs Ubuntu Tweak.

Why is Tweak important? because I no longer have to go searching for a Metacity theme which has the window control buttons on the right instead of the left. You can change that setting and many others easily using Ubuntu Tweak. So I now have a laptop with almost all the software I need already installed simply by running a command line script.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Thursday, 8 April 2010

I got the latest issue of Linux Format in the mail the other day. It comes from the U.K., wrapped in a heavy plastic protective bag. Each issue also comes with a DVD. When you pick up the magazine wrapped like that, you can immediately feel the outline of the DVD. When I picked up the current issue, it felt like there was no DVD in it at all. On opening the plastic cover I found the DVD there - they have changed the DVD physical composition. The new DVD is called an Eco-Disc and is much thinner than a normal DVD. It is also much more flexible, which makes it ideal for shipping through the world's postal systems. My computer can easily read the new DVD, so as long as that happens, I guess I'm a happy guy.


 

At work, I have finally put the log file reader I was working on to bed (fingers-crossed). I am now working on an upgrade to one of our support programs. I will create a translation engine which takes a semi-English request and translates it to a SQL statement so we can send that to the database server. The SQL will almost always end up being humongous and will almost always run on the server in less than a second.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Wednesday, 7 April 2010

In my silly signs section, I have shown a lot of sales signs for store items. I like these, as I have personally experienced this kind of advertising.

Years ago, there used to be a store in Spokane called Future Shop. Future Shop was kind of the Best Buy of Canada - it had lots of stuff, but the prices and the service weren't that great. I was attracted to the store by their newspaper ad and one day stopped by to check out some of the sale items.

In their printer section, they had an HP printer on sale for something like $49.98. If you looked closely at the sign, you could see the original price was $49.99. So, driving 30 miles to see items that were knocked down a penny? Not my kind of store. I never did buy anything in Future Shop, and it is now just a memory for Spokane. Like Circuit City is.


 

For the Saturday meeting of the North Idaho Linux Users Group, we have tentatively scheduled a talk on how to install and configure MythTV. MythTV may be a really cool application for recording and playing back just about any kind of multimedia, but it's setup process is completely terrible. It reminds me of the torture I suffered trying to install early versions of Linux, which all required you to know way too much about the hardware on your machine. Installation was always a painful process instead of the snap it is now. Hopefully, MythTV will follow in Linux's footsteps when it comes to configuration, but for now we have someone who can explain how to do it.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Tuesday, 6 April 2010

I am continuing work on the North Idaho Mineral Club web site. I spent the evening setting up the menu system for the web site. There are two levels to the menu and I am looking for a way to have the second level be pulled down when you hover over the first level. I know it can be done with Drupal, but it is escaping me right now. I have tried two different add-on modules so far and they did not do the job. I guess I'll have to keep looking.

When I go to LinuxFest Northwest at the end of the month, I will be attending some conference sessions that have to do with Drupal. I hope to pick up some valuable information about how to configure the web site there. I am looking forward to the conference.


 

I haven't mentioned this, but we keep getting snowed on here. It's done that at least three or four times in the last couple of weeks, but it always melts immediately. We are due for some more this morning, which is expected to turn to rain later today. Personally, I'm a big fan of mild weather, and this is pretty mild.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Monday, 5 April 2010

I worked on the new web site for the North Idaho Mineral Club over the weekend. I installed Drupal on my local machine, since I was unsatisfied with what I could do with WordPress. With Drupal, I think there is enough flexibility to allow me to do what I want for the web site.

I will be using the logo on the old web site for the new web site. The site will have many more pages than the old one and will have more visual content, too. I just need to find the email I sent to my fellow club members about this stuff, so I can create the new site sections.


 

I cooked a pizza in my 14" Dutch oven on Saturday. It went well and the pizza was really good. I did make the mistake of getting a Papa Murphy's 14" pizza, though. Never try to cook a 14" pizza in a 14" Dutch oven. It stretches and tends to pile up on the sides of the oven. Next time I will do a 12" pizza.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Friday, 2 April 2010

So, Mark Shuttleworth has decreed that the final location of the window controls in Ubuntu 10.04 will be on the left. He has also decreed that the button order will change to close, minimize, maximize. So now the most catastrophic control is right next to the File menu item, one of the most used controls. That makes as much sense to me as a screen door on a submarine. But what Tsar Shuttleworth says is what goes. As for me, I am going to find a Metacity theme that puts that close button as far away from other controls as possible.


 

A co-worker suggested a food I can cook in a Dutch oven which will blow the Boy Scouts socks off: pizza. I have friends who cook pizza in their Dutch ovens, but I have never done it myself. With that in mind, I will go get a Papa Murphy's medium combo this weekend and we will see if that is a viable demo for the scouts. If not, I can always fall back on the tamale casserole.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Thursday, 1 April 2010

I posted a bash script here last year that draws a happy face in your terminal using text graphics and the 'tput' command. I picked that up on the Internet and it was fun, so I thought, "Why not post it?"

Someone else found that the script used 'tput' and posted a reply to my original post. He has written a script that is animated using 'tput'. You can pick up his script by going here.

Copy his script to your clipboard, then paste it in an empty file in your text editor. Save the file as 'feet.sh'. Then go in to your terminal and do a 'chmod 755 feet.sh' to make the script executable. From your command line, type './feet.sh' and the script will run. To exit from it, hit Ctrl-D.


 

I have volunteered to give a Dutch oven demonstration to a gaggle of Boy Scouts in a week and a half. All I have to do is figure out what to say and what to cook for them. They are already familiar with cooking sloppy foods like stews in a Dutch oven, so I thought I would do something that required some baking. Maybe a tamale casserole is a good choice.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News