Documents

Archives

Search

BLOGical Thoughts Archive

March 2010

Wednesday, 31 March 2010

I have been looking for quite a while for an easy way to remotely administrate computers. While listening to the Ubuntu UK podcast yesterday morning (Season 1, Episode 16), I heard them recommend gitso (http://code.google.com/p/gitso/), so I went to the web site and took a look. It turned out to be exactly what I was looking for.

gitso is a frontend to vnc to allow reverse connections. It is installed on both the support person's computer and the computer of the person who needs help. gitso is started first on the support machine. The person needing help is then given the IP address of the support machine, and they use gitso to connect to the support machine. The support machine can then interact with the other machine.

To check out how it works, I installed gitso on two virtual machines. One was running Ubuntu 8.10 and the other was running Ubuntu 9.10. The program was easily installed on both machines and the connection between them worked great. I will be using gitso for supporting remote computers.

The following is instructions on how to install gitso on Ubuntu, as the DEB package has incomplete dependencies in it.

  1. Start up the Synaptic Package Manager, then search for and install the following packages:
    • x11vnc (that's eleven, not 'ii')
    • xtightvncviewer
    • python-wxtools
  2. Go to the gitso web site and download the the DEB file for Ubuntu.
  3. Use the file manager to double-click on the DEB file. Install the file using gdebi.

The program will appear in the Internet section of your Applications menu. Note that if the support machine is behind a router, the router will need to have port 5500 open to the support machine (port forward).


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Tuesday, 30 March 2010

I am still checking out the Ubuntu 10.04 beta distro. I absolutely will not put up with windows buttons on the left, so I will have to change the theme to one where the buttons are on the right. Only a brain-dead idiot would put them where they are right now. Or someone who thinks the KDE 4 start menu is more efficient and easier to use than the old KDE menu. Or someone who thinks 3-D movies you can only see with special glasses are the newest, bestest thingy in the world.

I also ran across a problem with the new distro. If you copy more than 5.8GB from one filesystem to another in a single copy, Nautilus will hang up. You will only get the first 5.8GB of the copy. The workaround is to copy smaller chunks. I found this trying to back up my laptop home directory onto a USB drive. The home directory has 21GB of files in it and really needs some spring housecleaning.


 

It took me 15 months, but I finally used all of the hot sauce in that 32 ounce bottle of Tapatío. I will have to pick up another bottle on Saturday. I really like that hot sauce, as it isn't mostly vinegar, like all the others.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Monday, 29 March 2010

I successfully installed Ubuntu 10.04 beta 1 on my laptop on Saturday, at the North Idaho Linux Users Group technical session in Rathdrum. I then installed the programs they had left off of the CD. There were further disappointments that I found with the new distro and updated programs.

Canonical is pulling a Microsoft by renaming items and moving them around in the menus. There is no more Display item in the Preferences menu: it is now called Monitor. For no particularly good reason, either. I'm sure there are more items like this. Every time someone does something like this, two things happen. One is I get pissed off when I can't find what I'm looking for. The second thing is, I wonder what they are hiding. Not a good move, Canonical.

I installed the CompizConfig Settings Manager so I could control how Compiz works, and I found that the Cube Reflection and Deformation effects had been removed. This means that when I use the desk cube to move to another desktop, it looks like a cube instead of my favorite cylinder look.

The big gotcha in all this is still moving the window controls from the upper right of the window to the upper left, just above the program menu. I reiterate: never, never, never put controls that can potentially cause catastrophic data loss near controls you use all the time. I would say that putting the window Exit button directly above the Edit menu would qualify. You may say that Mac OS/X does this, and I would respond with "Yes, but that button does not cause an exit from the program on a Mac. It acts like a Minimize button, instead." Once again, get a clue, Canonical.


 

On Saturday, I moved my truck in front of the house, so I could throw some trash bags in it to dump on my way to the NILUG meeting. I got in the truck to go to the meeting and the battery acted like it was dead. So I got out my jumper station and jumped the truck to start it, thinking the battery just needed a charge. Every place I stopped, I needed to jump it again to start it.

When I finally got home again, I looked closely at the battery and found that the negative battery clamp was broken and was not making good contact with the battery terminal. Luckily, I had a much better replacement for it in my toolbox, so I ended up doing some repair work on the truck. The battery wasn't dead and everything works fine now.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Friday, 26 March 2010

Before I install Ubuntu 10.04 beta 1 on my laptop on Saturday, I will make a list of the items that are currently installed on the laptop. I will have to do this because I have taken another look at the live CD, and there is a lot of stuff missing from the CD that was on the 9.04 CD. The 'social networking' and 'cloud' software included on the 10.04 CD must be huge. And those are two items I will not be using.

Having the windows control buttons on the upper left instead of the upper right in Unbuntu 10.04 is also a huge problem. I know I keep harping on this, but it is very important. Canonical has fallen for Fitt's Law, which states "the larger an item is, and the closer it is to your cursor, the easier it is to click on". They should be obeying the more-or-less opposite of Fitt's Law: "uncommon or dangerous UI items should be difficult to click on". Obviously, they have fallen in love with the Mac OS/X interface. (I guess you cold say I am an opponent of bad design with bling.)

One of the reasons I no longer use KDE and have chosen to use Gnome as my desktop manager is that the KDE folks persisted in making their manager harder to use. It takes more clicks to navigate the start menu than it used to, and you can't easily see where you are in the process. When this kind of stubborn attitude persists, instead of arguing with the fools, I move on. As I may do with Ubuntu. We shall see.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Thursday, 25 March 2010

I downloaded Ubuntu 10.04 Beta 1 yesterday. I have run it as a live CD on my laptop and I plan to install it on the laptop on Saturday at the North Idaho Linux Users Group technical session.

From my short inspection of the new version, I see several things that are disappointing. The first is that The Gimp has been removed. That is an absolutely essential program for me, as I use it all the time. Not having it on the CD means I will have to take the trouble of downloading and installing it from the repositories. I know why they removed it, but I think they were wrong in doing so.

The entire boot process is completely different from older versions. Why did they do this? Extra bling? I'm sure their reason will be something like "We wanted the boot process to be easier to understand by the unwashed masses." Yeah, that's a good reason.

The basic theme has window control buttons moved from the upper right edge of the window to the upper left. This completely violates good programming practices. Never, never put an object that can cause catastrophic failures (in this case, the Exit button) anywhere near some object you use all the time (the File or edit menus).

One of the reasons they are removing programs is they are now including programs that support something called 'social computing'. I have no interest in Facebook or Twitter, so why would I even look at their 'social computing' stuff? I use the computer to get computing things done, not to gab with friends. Canonical, I think you are going down the popular path that Microsoft has always tread. Be very careful.

My disappointment with Ubuntu 9.10 and the changes they have made for 10.04 have prompted me to begin searching for a possible replacement for Ubuntu. I really don't want to do that, as Ubuntu is a well-integrated distribution, but Canonical has taken a fork in the development road that I may not be able to follow.


 

Are commercial web sites just not paying attention? When I go to a web site, the millisecond I see a full page popover add, I leave. That means the site gets exactly one hit from me for that day. I'm sure they can monitor this and determine that I think those ads are the worst invention since the Yugo. Get a clue, guys.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Wednesday, 24 March 2010

It's nice that when at work I make an obscure reference to some movie like 'The Fifth Element' or 'The Princess Bride', all my co-workers understand the reference. We all pretty much have the same things in common, except that I think professional sports are a waste of time and money, and I don't really do gaming like they do. At least with the games, I can understand where they are coming from, though.

There is also a large contingent of my co-workers that not only understand Linux, but also work with it or use it at home. Part of our product consists of a rack-mount server with lots of CPUs and a huge chunk of RAM, running Debian Linux. We have at least two people who write command line scripts to help install and update software on the server, so those two really know Linux. Others are familiar with it, too, since when we are testing or developing we have to be able to navigate and extract useful information from the server. Our product support people also must be familar with Linux to help customers with their problems. All in all, I think my job is an ideal place for someone with my bias towards Linux.


 

With apologies to Monty Python and the Holy Grail

And the Lord spake, saying,"First thou shalt download the Holy Build. Then shalt thou count to three, no more, no less. Three shall be the number thou shalt count, and the number of the counting shall be three. Four shalt thou not count, neither count thou two, excepting that thou then proceed to three. Five is right out."

"Once the number three, being the third number, be reached, then runnest thou thy Holy Build of (program name here), who, being naughty in my sight, shall snuff it. Amen"


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Tuesday, 23 March 2010

After working on it most of last evening, I finally figured out why I could not write a required file to the localhost web site. The WordPress install requires the file to be written, so I absolutely had to figure out what the problem was. I tried changing file permissions and changing ownership of the file, but nothing worked. Now I can definitely blame the problem on...are you ready for this? MICROSOFT!!

I suppose I should explain. WordPress supplies all their files in either a .gz or .zip file. I picked up the .zip, as Linux is just as comfortable with that as .gz. It turns out, that was the wrong thing to do. Every text file in that package had carriage return/line feeds at the end of each line, instead of just the line feed that Unix/Linux uses. This CR/LF requirement is a Microsoft invention, just like using backslashes for path specifications. They do crap like that so they can be unique, I suppose. And so they can drive other people crazy.

At any rate, my localhost (Linux) web server did not like those carriage returns one bit. It refused to write the modified file from the old one. So I loaded up my web page editor, loaded the file and used the editor's built-in end of line selector to select Unix-style end of line. I then saved the file out and everything worked after that.

To be absolutely consistent, I should have just downloaded the .gz package and installed it, but the .zip package seems to be working okay, so I will stick with that. I can now do some web design for the new North Idaho Mineral Club web site.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

Monday, 22 March 2010

I upgraded the North Idaho Linux Users Group web site over the weekend. I backed up the database, backed up the entire web site and then installed the latest version of WordPress on the web site. I then changed the theme for the web site. I hope everyone likes the new theme.

I also set up my workstation so I could do an experimental install of WordPress for the North Idaho Mineral Club. Unfortunately, that did not go as well as the other install. I am having trouble with read/write permissions for that local web site, so I can't do anything with it yet. This may be an ownership problem that is displayed as a permissions problem, so I will try adjusting file ownership, first.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Friday, 19 March 2010

I will be working on web sites this weekend. I am designing a makeover for the North Idaho Mineral Club web site. We will be moving to a content management system, so people who are not computer-savvy will be able to supply content to the web site.

I am currently looking for a theme I can use for the web site. I need a theme that is somewhat neutral so I can add gem and mineral stuff to it to orient it to the web site's topic. This sounds simple, but it isn't. I haven't had much luck in this so far.

I will also add new sections to the web site and reorganize the current content to make more sense. Any web site where it's hard to determine where stuff is, is not useful and just plain annoying. I plan to have the new web site be the least annoying it possibly can be.

I have not yet decided to have a forum section. Most members of the club are not computer-oriented, so I suspect there won't be much use of such a forum. Likewise, a mailing list might not be of much use, although most of the members do have email. I will think that one over.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Thursday, 18 March 2010

I am now in to the section of A Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux where he explains about chroot and how to chroot someone. He even presents an extra utility written in C that allows you to set a chroot jail and switch to a particular user. Very nice. His explanation of chroot is easy to understand, too. I seem to be getting quite a bit out of this book.

I will enter and compile that utility. It is short and easy to understand, and it seems to be very useful. It's called uchroot, which stands for user chroot.


 

The North Idaho Mineral Club has its meeting tonight. I will bring along the load of jade and agate I bought at the auction last Friday. There are people at work who are also interested in what I got, so I will bring it in for them to see.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Wednesday, 17 March 2010

I am learning quite a bit from the Linux book I got the other day. It's called A Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux, by Mark G. Sobell. It's heavily biased towards the command line, because if you really want to learn about your system, you need to know a bunch of stuff that can only be demonstrated on the command line. I am approximately 1/3 of the way through the book's 1,200 pages and am currently learning about how Ubuntu has a locked root account, and how to unlock it if you want. Next is how the initialization system in Ubuntu has changed from the old style SysVInit style to the new Upstart init. I may be ready for the LPI Linux Certification in a Nutshell book after I finish this one.


 

If you're Irish, let me take this opportunity to wish you a happy St. Patrick's Day. If you aren't Irish, get to work. <G>


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Tuesday, 16 March 2010

One of the NILUG members needs to export some values from a spreadsheet to another program. I pointed him at the OpenOffice.org Calc macro capability. I don't know much about that subject myself, but there has to be a book out there that can help. I do have a book called OpenOffice.org 1.0 Resource Kit, but I'm not sure how well that would apply to version 3.0.

He wanted me to write a program to keep track of all the numbers that the spreadsheet already keeps track of, but I think the spread sheet does a perfectly good job. The macro would be the only thing that needs to be done to the spreadsheet to provide him with a complete solution.


 

I had a complaint the other day about the color of links from this web page, so I changed the colors. I guess some people just don't like brown. <BG>


 

We are going to have an unseasonally warm day today - mid 60's. I'm glad I put my snow tires away. This weather is all part of a global warming pattern which many people are too stupid to recognize. Just like last winter's and the one before that dumped a ton of snow on us. If you are convinced that the planet isn't warming up, though, nothing I could say would convince you otherwise. So we'll leave it at that.


 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Monday, 15 March 2010

I did participate in the auction on Friday night. I ended up with 3 pounds of fire agate and 14 pounds of jade. The jade was a real steal at $1.42 a pound. Some of it is just okay, and some of it is excellent, which is what I would expect from a regular auction

There was a box full of turquoise and garnets I would have liked to have gotten, but I was outbid on that. And the opening bid on the table containing the old Wagner waffle iron was above the limit I had set myself for that item. I still enjoyed myself, and will probably go again if something interesting turns up.


We should be organizing talks for upcoming general sessions of the North Idaho Linux Users Group. The session on Saturday was mostly an install-fest instead of a meeting where we learn something new. There were three 1-U rack-mount computers there that were being installed. One of them was getting Clark-Connect, which is a network and gateway solution with content filtering and intrusion protection. The others were getting Ubuntu.

If we schedule talks, then we could probably do real Install-Fests instead of the impromptu ones we do at the general session.


Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

Local and Other News

Friday, 12 March 2010

I have decided to go to LinuxFest Northwest in Bellingham, WA next month. I almost went to last year's LinuxFest, but something got in the way. This year, I have almost the entire year planned out, and this was included in my plans.

The only problem I have had with this decision is trying to find out exactly where in Bellingham the thing was being held. Usually when someone does an event like this, they provide the following on the site home page: who, what, when, where and why. The 'where' portion on their web page just says Bellingham, WA. Well, Bellingham is a big town - couldn't they narrow that down a bit? Instead of my having to spend 20 minutes on their web site trying to find out that it will be held at Bellingham Technical College? That information was in a tier 3 page, with an unobtrusive link only from the Logistics page.

Despite my problems with their information about where the LinuxFest will be held, I am sure I will enjoy it. I intend to take my teardrop trailer over there and camp out at a campground close to the event. I hope the weather is nice.


I may end up at an auction tonight. I have been monitoring their web site for months now, and this is the first time I think I may actually participate. I have stopped by there on the way home from work several times, when a picture on their web site grabs my attention. The pictures have always been more interesting the the actual items, but maybe this time will be different.


Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

Local and Other News

Thursday, 11 March 2010

I am going to take my quad-core computer to the NILUG meeting on Saturday. I have installed four or five lightweight Linux distros on it as virtual machines, so I can demo each of the environments. These distros are particularly effective on old machines with limited resources. Most of the distros will run in 256MB of memory and with less than 5GB of hard disk.

The whole purpose of this exercise is to show people that there are alternatives to Windows 98, etal, for their old computers. Those alternatives are modern, fast and virus-free.


I got a phone call from the DMV last night. It turns out that the license tags for my Dodge Stealth, which I thought I had lost, had never made it to me. They were returned to the DMV last June because of insufficient address concerns. Since there is only one Michael Burton in Hayden, ID and I've been here for 26 years, I can't think of what the idiot at the Post Office was thinking. Or not thinking. Anyway, I have to pick the tags up today so I will be legal when I use the car to pull my teardrop trailer to Bellingham, WA next month.


Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

Local and Other News

Wednesday, 10 March 2010

I added two new podcast feeds to my hpodder client and it wanted to download 47 'new' podcasts. So I am firing that program. I have downloaded gpodder and I will use that instead, starting tomorrow morning. I have already imported most of the feeds I had in hpodder, but there are a couple more I need to add.


This weekend will be busy. There is a North Idaho Linux Users Group meeting in Post Falls on Saturday, where we will continue helping the uninitiated with the mysteries and goodness of Linux.

On Sunday, I will go over to the Spokane County fairgrounds to attend the Spokane Rock Rollers Gem and Mineral show. They hold a pretty good show, so it should be very interesting. This year the only thing I could use would be a slab saw, but they cost a lot of money, so I won't be looking real hard.

Sometime this weekend, I will also need to back up the NILUG web site and upgrade its software. I will probably change the web site theme, too.


Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

Local and Other News

Tuesday, 9 March 2010

I am thinking about taking a Linux certification exam. To that end, I am reading up on the kinds of things they will ask on the exam. A lot of that is boring, as I already know it. The book I am using has over 1,000 pages and I am on page 64, so it will take me a while to get through it all. We will see how persistent I am.

I have another book that is about the same length, which is devoted to certification. It's an O'Reilly book called "LPI Certification in a Nutshell". Maybe that's the one I should be reading. Not having an ebook reader has certain advantages, and devoting my time to something more constructive is one of them.


As I predicted, since I removed the snow plow and changed to summer tires, the weather people are now predicting snow. Typical of the weather to do this.


Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

Local and Other News

Monday, 8 March 2010

Looking for a replacement for the crappy, Cooler ebook reader, I went over to the Barnes and Noble in Spokane on Saturday to evaluate their Nook ebook reader. There were at least three things I didn't like about it, so I didn't purchase one.

The built-in fonts for the device are limited. There are only two fonts, and neither of them can be enlarged a lot. I enlarged to the largest size and I almost could not read the result, as it was too small. That alone would prevent me from purchasing the device.

The Nook is slow. The Cooler was slow to initialize, but the Nook is slow when you turn pages. Way too slow for me.

Finally, the Nook, like the Kindle, is positioned to sell books and periodicals, not just allow you to read them. That is its main object. There are way too many controls on it that require you to connect to a web site and buy something, that something being way overpriced. This reminds me of the printer industry and their insistence that their printer ink is more precious than diamonds.

I also went to a couple of ebook reader comparison web sites and viewed the comparisons. The bottom line is, I won't be getting a new reader soon.


I started my spring chores on Sunday. I put away the snow plow blade on my truck and changed the tires on my car back to regular tires. This probably means we'll be getting some snow in the next week, but I will just drive the truck to work if we do.


Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software

Friday, 5 March 2010

I discovered that the latest version of MonoDevelop has the static window designer built into it. This is a very good thing. It will allow me yet another way to create open source programs without using commercial software.

I played around with MonoDevelop yesterday and have an idea of what it would take to convert gdvdslides over to C#. There is a major difference in the way that stetic lays out controls in windows, though. You have to use containers to lay out the controls, and sometimes it requires a lot of containers. In Lazarus, the layout is static and you can anchor the control to any of the four edges of a window, so the Lazarus controls can act just like the ones laid out with stetic.

Another major difference is how events are connected. I haven't played with that yet, but I expect it to conform to the 'signals' and 'sinks' method used by the underlying GTK library.


My ebook reader quit completely on me yesterday. Again. I will be looking into a real ebook reader. In the meantime, if you entertain thoughts of purchasing a Cooler reader, my advice is don't do it.


So, mail delivery has gone from twice daily, seven days a week, down to once a day, 5 days a week. The more days you eliminate from delivery, the more money will be saved, so why not three days a week, or even two days? This is a typical solution to a problem caused by a government-run business. This is what always happens when government is involved in business. Got that, GM? AIG?


Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

Local and Other News

Thursday, 4 March 2010

I spent yesterday debugging the log file reader I am doing at work. There is still quite a ramp-up for me with Java and the Eclipse IDE. I have the reader running, but it doesn't seem to be reading log files. I will work on that today.

Next up for me at work is to modify our report program to do more emailing. I will have to dig up some information about this on the Internet. I did some of this when I was working on the program for the latest release, but the new request is more complex and I need to get and store more (encrypted) information about the person who is doing the emailing.


I installed Mono and MonoDevelop on Ubuntu 8.10 yesterday. There was a plugin for MonoDevelop called stetic that I installed, which allowed me to do the kind of window design I am used to doing in Delphi and Lazarus. Way cool. The problem is, the stetic plugin does not sem to be available for Ubuntu 9.04. I am seriously unhappy about that.


I took the night off and finished re-reading War of Honor, so I haven't done anything around the house that I should be doing.


Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software

Wednesday, 3 March 2010

At work, I started to test the Java log file reader I've been writing and found that I no longer have a valid way to do that. In the six months or so since I've done any Java stuff at work, I knew there had been changes due to the brand new console we wrote in Air and Flex. But I didn't expect those changes to ripple in to our manager, which is an entirely separate system (although there are communication interfaces).

So I had to get someone to help me set up my system for the new software. What a pain. And it will all change on Friday, when we transition from CVS to Subversion for our change control.

At any rate, my system should now be set up so I can test the new log file reader. That should be fun...


Silly sign of the day:


Not so silly, is it?


Free/Open Source Software

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

Local and Other News

Tuesday, 2 March 2010

I'm not having much luck getting the latest (alpha) version of Lazarus to work. I posted the problem on the Lazarus forum and the suggestions that came back on how to fix the problem did not fix it. I still get a resource compilation error. I even get one on an entirely new project. There is something fundamentally wrong with the Lazarus alpha build.

The reason I am concentrating on this new version of the Lazarus IDE is that there are many fixes in it for problems I had to work around in gdvdslides. It certainly would be nice to put drag and drop back in the program.


Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

Local and Other News

Monday, 1 March 2010

The NILUG technical meeting was very good. I helped two new people put Ubuntu Linux on their IBM laptops. I also removed Lazarus from my laptop and installed the latest version. The only problem with doing that was an error I got when compiling gdvdslides. I will look into the error tonight.


I replaced a 25 year old bathtub faucet on Saturday. It was tough to get the faucet out, but the replacement was very easy to install. And it works better than the original one ever did.

I also re-worked my personal bookmarks page. It still uses collapsing menus, but the coding for that is very different and I like the way they work a lot better.


Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

Local and Other News