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BLOGical Thoughts Archive

May 2017

Monday, 29 May, 2017

I am still doing a lot of 3D printing. I did a final version of the nameplate for my Plymouth and I did two more parts for the printer. One was an enhanced fan duct for the printer, and the other is a new mount for my Raspberry Pi camera. I did both of them from scratch, using the Tinkercad web site and Slic3r software. They both came out pretty well.


I have finished the 3rd edition of the Teardrops and Tiny Travel Trailers Cookbook and have posted it on my cookbooks web page. It is three times larger than the 2nd edition (288 pages).

That should take care of my cookbook commitments for a while. Now I just have to worry about classic car commitments, 3D printing and mineral club commitments.


The North Idaho Mineral Club Gem, Mineral, Rock and Jewelry Show for 2017 will be held this weekend, June 3rd and 4th, at the North Idaho Fairgrounds. I will be helping with set up on Friday and will also attend a two hour car show that day. A busy time for all.


Quote of the day:

Some people are born mediocre, some people achieve mediocrity, and some people have mediocrity thrust upon them.
     Joseph Heller

Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software


Hobby Stuff


Security Theater/"Intellectual Property"/Big Brother

Monday, 22 May, 2017

I participated in 4 car events last week: three cruises and a car show. I took pictures at all the events and have posted them on the Phuddy Duddy Cruisers web site. I am also still working on an outdoor cookbook, so it was a busy week for me.


I finished designing and printing a nameplate for my 1949 Plymouth. The 'Deluxe' plate is designed to cover up two holes in the passenger-side front fender. The fender is from another model of Plymouth and the holes were to hold extra chrome. The shop that painted my car was unaware of this and left the holes open.

I intend to clean the plate up a bit and spray it with shiny chrome spray paint.


Quote of the day:

Its failings notwithstanding, there is much to be said in favor of journalism in that by giving us the opinion of the uneducated, it keeps us in touch with the ignorance of the community.
     Oscar Wilde

Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software


Hobby Stuff


Security Theater/"Intellectual Property"/Big Brother

Tuesday, 16 May, 2017

I got some drain pipe to run under my driveway in two places. The old drain pipe is 33 years old and is falling apart. The new pipe comes in five ten foot sections and is stuck together with couplers. I will use two sections at one point across the drive, and the other three at the start of the drive. I have to wait for it to stop raining before I can install the new pipe.

The county is working on Boot Hill Road, so every time I go somewhere, I have to contend with that. So far, they have re-ditched the road and have scraped and layed down new pit run in some sections. They then put on the fine material and rolled it all flat. When they finish all that, they will lay down the oil mixture they use in place of paving material, and we will have an almost-paved road. After 33 years of dirt, that will be a nice change.


I demonstrated my 3D printer at the North Idaho Linux User Group meeting last Saturday. The demo was met with approval and great interest. Some of the people were interested enough to look into purchasing one for themselves.

I got an on/off switch for my power supply from one of the guys at the meeting. It was taller than the cutout in the case, so I had to elongate the opening. I also had to drill a new hole for the power-on LED. I now have all the parts to complete the bench supply.


Quote of the day:

Some people are born mediocre, some people achieve mediocrity, and some people have mediocrity thrust upon them.
     Joseph Heller

Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software


Hobby Stuff


Security Theater/"Intellectual Property"/Big Brother

Friday, 12 May, 2017

My 3D printer got all the way through printing the power supply case front. I cleaned it up and mounted it. Here is what it looks like


Note that I have not yet gotten an on/off switch for it and have not yet wired it up. That's why you can see the wires behind the panel.

I also added a few more seconds to the video of the printer printing.


I am still working on the Teardrops and Tiny Travel Trailers forum cookbook update. It has increased in size from 93 pages to 186 pages, and I am nowhere near completion of the update. Lots of hard work. I hope everyone will appreciate it.


Quote of the day:

The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not "Eureka!" (I found it!) but "That's funny ..."
     Isaac Asimov

Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software


Hobby Stuff


Security Theater/"Intellectual Property"/Big Brother

Tuesday, 9 May, 2017

I have some trouble printing some objects with my 3D printer. Yesterday I met a local guy who has been doing this for a lot longer than I have, and he indicated that he did not use the Cura slicing program, but one called slic3r.

When you get a model all set to be printed, a file with instructions for the printer on how to print it must be generated. The printer will lay down liquid plastic one layer at a time, and will build on layers already layed down. These layers are called slices, and special programs have been written to look at a model file and create a file that contains the slicing information.

The slicing file also includes all the other information required for printing, like the plastic extrusion temperature, printing bed temperature, height of each layer and many, many more items.

This brings us back to the slicing programs. Many people I have watched on YouTube use Cura. It's a kind of dumbed down slicer, as it doesn't give you the control you really need to completely control the print. This makes it easy for most people, but can result in spectacular failures.

On the other hand, I have now tried the slic3r program. It provides complete control over the printing process. I am currently printing an enclosure for a power supply I am building and slic3r is taking care of that perfectly, unlike the failures I had with this model using Cura to do the slicing.

You can see the start of the printing of a case for a power supply if you click here.


Quote of the day:

If a man neglects to enforce his rights, he cannot complain if, after a while, the law follows his example.
     Oliver Wendell Holmes

Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software


Hobby Stuff


Security Theater/"Intellectual Property"/Big Brother

Sunday, 4 May, 2017

There are two car shows this weekend and I am going to both of them. The one on Saturday looks like it may be rained on, so I will take my '52 to it. I will take my '49 and drone to the one on Sunday. This should be fun after spending 4 months in the house.


Now that I have the 3D printer temperatures correct, I have moved from printing with PLA plastic to printing with ABS. This requires higher extrusion and print bed temperatures. I am printing a case for a bench lab supply I am building. Using ABS, the case's two rear feet took an hour each to print. I am now printing the front of the case and I expect it to take at least 15 hours.


Quote of the day:

The majority of the stupid is invincible and guaranteed for all time. The terror of their tyranny, however, is alleviated by their lack of consistency.
     Albert Einstein

Silly sign of the day:


Free/Open Source Software


Hobby Stuff


Security Theater/"Intellectual Property"/Big Brother