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BLOGical Thoughts Archive

November 2010

Tuesday, 30 November 2010

Mother Nature is going to take a real dump on us today. I am going to drive my 4x4 truck to work, so I don't end up stuck somewhere. I can then also plow my way back to the house tonight. It seems this winter will be a repeat of 2008, which was way too much snow for me.

I hope this downfall of nature doesn't last all winter, though. I have projects in the garage that need finishing, and I need to be able to get to the garage and remain warm enough there to finish them.



 

I have uploaded more pictures of my 1952 Plymouth restoration on Google. There is a good one of the engine compartment with most of the engine parts restored. The car is beginning to look very good.

I would have liked to have used the Plymouth at Thanksgiving, but I suppose it's a good thing that didn't happen. Too much snow and too slick for an old rear wheel drive car with regular tires.



 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local/Other News/Security Theater

Monday, 29 November 2010

I installed the 32-bit version of Linux Mint 10 on my laptop at the North Idaho Linux Users Group technical session on Saturday. That went so well that I installed the 64-bit version on my 64-bit workstation, too. It's very nice that I don't have to download all that multimedia stuff to get DVD playing to work. Lazarus installed easily and so did VirtualBox. I am tempted to also install it on this workstation, but I will hold off until I can fully evaluate it on the machines I have already updated.



 

I have Thanksgiving with friends every year, as my family is so far away. The dinner is usually in Otis Orchards, but this year it was held at their son's house above Cougar Gulch near Coeur d'Alene. The house is up on top of a hill above Cougar Gulch, and it had been snowing all day. Usually the road is in pretty good shape, but that night it wasn't.

It's 5 miles from the highway to their house. I got within 1/3 mile in my Honda, and just could not go any farther. I started hiking up to the house, but they were coming down, so I parked my car off the road and hitched a ride up to the house.

It turns out that they were out and about because some other people at the dinner had skidded off the slick road into the ravine. I saw where they had done that, but all I thought was, "I'm glad that's not me. I hope everyone is okay." They were all okay, but they could not haul the car out using two 4 wheel drive trucks with chains. They were going to call AAA to do that.

Needless to say, I was even more careful going down that hill on my way home.



 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local/Other News/Security Theater

Wednesday, 24 November 2010

We are coming up on a four day weekend. As a result, there will be no postings here until Monday. Maybe by that time, it will warm up a bit. Right now it is 1° F in Hayden and -5° F in Spokane. And, of course, the wind is blowing. Thanksgiving day it will be 19° F, so maybe things will warm up.

I hope everyone has a nice Thanksgiving. Don't eat too much and don't spend too much money on Black Friday.



 

There are a lot of web pages out there that many of us just can't read. The page may have text that's the wrong color with the background used, or the text is too small for those of us whose eyesight is not what it used to be. If you are really intent on reading the page, there is a solution (courtesy of Leo LaPorte, The Tech Guy) - Readability.

Here is what you do: Go to http://lab.arc90.com/experiments/readability/. You will see a sample of text and a Settings area. Adjust the settings until you are happy with how the sample text looks. When you are done adjusting click and drag the Readability button to your browser's bookmark toolbar. That's all you have to do.

Now the next time you encounter a page that gives you trouble, while you are on the page, click the readability link in you bookmark toolbar. The text will be reformatted and the page will be replaced with the reformatted page, so you can easily read it. Cool, eh? Just don't forget that the Readability web site is experimental.



 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local/Other News/Security Theater

Tuesday, 23 November 2010

Yesterday I mentioned that I had moved a bunch of ISO images off of my DVR to an NAS. I never mentioned what it took to do that, though. It turns out that my DVR O/S, Mythbuntu, really isn't very good at discovering LAN connections. Unlike Ubuntu, there is no Network button that will display a file manager with all the available network devices. I guess XFCE just doesn't have that. So what exactly did I do to get the connection?

First, as super-user I created a directory in the /media directory for the connection. That becomes a permanent place that I can use when I connect to the MyBookWorld NAS device.

I then used the package manager to download and install the Samba server. I'm not completely sure I need it, but it was better to have it if I do. The Samba client software was already installed.

I used my web browser to log in to the router, since that has a list of the devices connected to it - including their IP addresses. I found that the MyBookWorld device was at 192.168.1.192 on my LAN. I then wrote a small shell program to do all the connection work for me and to bring the file manager up so I can copy files from a protected area of the DVR:

    #!/bin/bash
    sudo mount -o rw,users,iocharset=utf8,file_mode=0777,dir_mode=0777 -t cifs "//192.168.1.192/public" /media/mybookworld
    sudo thunar

I use the shell program to get me connected and use "sudo umount /media/mybookworld" to disconnect after I am finished. It all works fine, so I can't complain now about the lack of network support in XFCE.



 

I am glad I did my winter chores on the weekend. Right now there is about 6 inches of snow here at the house, it's 10° F and we are under a blizzard warning until about 10am. The high today is expected to be 15° F and with wind chill that translates to -16° F. I should have no problem getting to work, but there are others who are really not prepared. One of my co-workers is from Florida and neither of his cars has four wheel drive or snow tires. He is stuck with VPN for working from his house.



 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local/Other News/Security Theater

Monday, 22 November 2010

Over the weekend, our weather prompted me to finish up the chores I had been putting off. I put snow tires on my car and I hooked the snow plow up to the truck. It's a good thing I did that, as after I finish this blog entry, I will be going out and plowing so I can drive my car to work.

All that means I didn't get much work done on programming projects. I did move a boatload of ISO images off of my DVR and onto the MyBookWorld NAS. The NAS will hold 1TB of data, and it now has 300GB free. I will be weeding out the unnecessary cruft from the NAS and I hope to free up more space. I suppose I could always go out and get a 1TB USB drive, as they don't cost all that much now, but I will make do with what I have for now.



 

Those congress-critters keep making laws to restrict our rights and, every time, they exempt themselves. The latest: we are subjected to the naked scanning or groping at airports and the congress-critters are exempt. When do we say "Enough"? Did you know that social security isn't good enough for them? They exempted themselves in favor of their own private plan which is exempt from their 'fiscal administration'. What makes them better than us? I guess the fact that most of us keep voting for the idiots over and over again doesn't help our case.

How about this as an Amendment to the Constitution? "Congress shall make no law which exempts citizens or businesses from the application of any law."



 

What does the TSA acronym really stand for?

Transportation Security Administration Theatrical Security Agents
Taking Scissors Away Touching Stuff Aggressively
Too Stupid for Arby's Trampling Several Amendments
Teaching Submission to Americans Touching Sensitive Areas
Thousands Standing Around Testicle Searchers of America
Touch, Stroke, Assault Trained Sodomy Administrators
Terrorist Support Agency Teabag Squeezers of America
Testicles Scanned Aggressively To Stroke Asses
Terribly Senseless Antics Trampling Servile Americans
Target Sex Apples Thousands of Sexual Assaults
Trying to Stop Airtravel To Stoke Anger
Touching Scrotums Always Thoroughly Screwing America
Thoughtless Slobs Abound To Screw Anyone
Targeted Sexual Assault Taking Security Away
Treatment So Asinine This Sucks Always
Terrorists Satisified with Aftermath Tugging Sacks Assiduously
They See All Torturous Sex Acts
To Serve Al Queda Titillating Sexual Antics
Trains, Suggested Alternative Totalling Screwing Americans
Tight Space Administration Tawdry Strip Act
Time to Show All Totally Senseless Aggression
Taxpayer Supported Assault Typical State Action

Many thanks to Reason TV for the above. My personal favorite is "Too Stupid for Arby's".



 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local/Other News/Security Theater

Friday, 19 November 2010

I was at the mineral club meeting last night, so I didn't get anything done at home. I will be doing a lot of stuff this weekend that I put off, like changing the tires on my car, mounting the snow plow on the truck, changing a running light on the trailer and putting the trailer up and finishing the workbench. Since it will get up to only 29° F on Saturday, all that should be interesting.



 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

Thursday, 18 November 2010

I am still working on the soccer program's player statistics dialog. It is fairly complex and it involves a kind of coding I have avoided in the past, so it will take a while to finish. I can't work on it tonight, as I have a meeting to go to.

I was going to add another field to one of the tables to make things easier, but that would limit a player to playing for only one team. That is an unreasonable constraint, so I will not be doing it.



 

We got our first snow of the season last night. It looks like an inch or so, and it is fairly wet snow. Since I am still unprepared for it, I will be driving my truck to work today.



 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local/Other News/Security Theater

Wednesday, 17 November 2010

I started to hook up the controls in the soccer program's player statistics dialog last night, then stopped. The way I was going to do it would not work. It would have ended up with multiple entries in the player name list and wrong statistics. I have a new method mapped out, but it will be more difficult to implement (of course). I hope to get the dialog hooked up tonight.



 

The North Idaho Mineral Club did not seem to have a logo, so I fabbed one up and put it on the web site. I need to contact one lady to ensure that there really isn't one, though.



 

My 1952 Plymouth restoration is winding down to the end. When I got the car, it looked like this. That was approximately three years ago. Also, note that the teardrop trailer shown in those pictures is the one I will be pulling with the car.

Since that time, the car has gone through a lot. Those pictures show a general picture that indicates the car is in pretty good shape. Well, it's 58 years old and it has its problems, which are now rapidly disappearing. Pictures of the restoration project are here.

At this point, the wiring kit needs to be installed, along with any rewound electric motors. After that, the interior needs to be done. The radio should be coming back today. The car should be mostly complete at that point.



 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local/Other News/Security Theater

Tuesday, 16 November 2010

I am back working on the soccer program. I verified that the dialogs I have so far all work correctly, and I started work on the player statistics dialog. I have the dialog laid out, but no code for it has been written so far.

The player statistics dialog allows a coach to see how each player is doing. Its main purpose, however is to print a page with each player's statistics. I am saving all that printer stuff for later, so all I have to do right now is hook up the controls to the database tables.



 

I am actually still tweaking the North Idaho Mineral Club web site, even at this late date. I need a picture of the club logo for the web site, as I found out yesterday we actually have such a thing. If we don't have such a file, I at least need to know what the logo looks like. I do know it uses the picture of the state of Idaho made out of amethyst crystal and showing a 6-star garnet. That is exactly what is in the header of all the web site pages, so I extracted that image from the header. All I need to know now is what else goes on the logo.



 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local/Other News/Security Theater

Monday, 15 November 2010

I added more content to the North Idaho Mineral Club web site, so it would have some information on it that was lacking. I did this because I entered the web site in a Gem and Mineral web site contest run by the American Federation of Mineralogical Societies, as our club is a member. I think we may have a pretty good chance to win, judging by the quality of the other entries. Don't get me wrong - there is good content on those sites, but they are not laid out well and most of the time the graphics leave a lot to be desired.



 

I installed the 64-bit version of Linux Mint 9 on my AMD Quad workstation on Saturday at the North Idaho Linux Users Group meeting. The installation went fine, and by leaving my home partition untouched, even the desktop layout was saved from the old Ubuntu configuration.

When I got home from the meeting, I installed the applications that I use that are not part of the normal distribution (Lazarus, galculator and the like). The only one I had trouble with was VirtualBox. I had to get the latest version from the VirtualBox web site, and install it from the command line. All that went well. It installed fine and a menu entry showed up. The program ran okay, too. When I restarted the computer, though, the menu entry had disappeared. I had to edit the menu and manually add an entry for it.

If that's the only problems I have with Linux Mint, though, that will be just fine with me.



 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local/Other News/Security Theater

Friday, 12 November 2010

I cleaned up some of the code in the soccer program in preparation for the final push towards completion. I still have several dialogs to build and some printer reports to create. I also need to fill the web help pages in with useful content, and I need to include a tutorial in the help pages. Lots of work to do yet.



 

I am seriously considering installing the 64-bit version of Linux Mint 9 on my 64-bit workstation tomorrow at the North Idaho Users Group meeting. I have found that it is easy to configure the desktop to behave the way I am used to it behaving, and I think most of the software I use is in their repositories. So I will probably go for it, using the steps I set out two weeks ago.



 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local/Other News/Security Theater

Thursday, 11 November 2010

I got the soccer program's positioning and sizing code working last night. I fixed the database closed problem and then I had a database not open problem on start up. All fixed, so where ever the application was on your screen, and whatever size it was, that's how it will start up when you start the program again.



 

I am still tweaking the North Idaho Mineral Club web site. Last night, I added a couple of pictures to dress up an article on petrified forests. I also changed the background color slightly, making it darker. Other than that, I will add new content to the web site as it comes to me.



 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local/Other News/Security Theater

Wednesday, 10 November 2010

I am still working on the soccer program. I have added a database table that will be used to save information about the configuration of the program when it was last used. Things like was it maximized when we left, if not, where was it and how big. I have a problem with actually saving that information, though. It seems as if the database is already closed by the time I get around to saving stuff in the table. I will have to fix that tonight.



 

When I fixed the North Idaho Mineral Club web site menu yesterday, I did not notice that the new menu showed up at the very top of the page above the header picture. I fixed that last night by removing the print of the secondary links item in the page template. The web pages now look exactly like I would like them to.



 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local/Other News/Security Theater

Tuesday, 9 November 2010

I did some more work on the North Idaho Mineral Club web site last night. I moved all the menu items from the Primary Links block to the Secondary Links block. I then connected the Nice Menu (folding menus) to the Secondary Links block and displayed that block instead of the Primary Links block. All this effort was put in to remove all the menu items from the horizontal bar just below the page header. That bar menu was effectively useless, so removing the items which are also displayed on a menu on the left side of the page was a no-brainer (except for figuring out how to do it).

I did more work on the soccer program. I have the Reset Database Items dialog working completely now. I had to load default items into the tables in a different way than I originally tried. If there was anyone out there using this set of database components and talking on the Internet about how to use them to do massive table updates, I haven't found them yet. Anyway, next up is to go through each of the currently existing dialogs and making sure it works correctly.



 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local/Other News/Security Theater

Monday, 8 November 2010

I did not get as much done on the weekend as I wished to, but I still got some of it done. I did some work on the workbench, but have not yet finished it

I fixed my connection problem with work, as well. It turns out to have been a file permissions problem. I had put the Citrix certificate in its proper place in /usr/lib/ICAClient, but the file permissions on the it were set read and write for the owner only. I changed the permissions to read only for all users, and I can now remote into work. I did this on both this workstation and my 64-bit workstation, so I should have no trouble working from home now.

I started working on the soccer program again. I have fixed the problem with deleting database table contents, but I still can't add new content to the tables from a text file. They work just fine with the regular Delphi database controls, so it must be something I don't know about in writing the code to do it programatically. The program has more that needs to be done, and I hope to have a lot more finished before Thanksgiving, which is kind of an unofficial milestone for it.



 

I got my rebate from Verizon on Friday. Except it wasn't a rebate. It was a a $50 debit card from CitiBank, a rapacious money-lender I will have nothing to do with. On Saturday, I went to the Verizon store and attempted to get a real rebate, and they said they had no way to do that. Except there is a way, as is related in this article. I will have to take that card to my bank and transfer the funds to my checking account.

Why would Verizon do this? They obviously got some kind of sweetheart deal with the slimeballs at CitiBank, and the bank is hoping people will just go with the flow and use the debit card. So does Verizon go on my MacDonald's hit list? It should, but I will lose a bunch of money if I do that.



 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Friday, 5 November 2010

This weekend will be my get ready for winter weekend. I need to put up the teardrop trailer, attach the plow to my truck and change the tires on my car. While I am at it, I need to finish the workbench I have half-assembled and move the rock saws to it, so they are out of the way. The Dodge needs to be put up for the winter, too.

For indoor tasks, I need to get my Citrix connection working again, so I can remote into work. Then start work again on the soccer program. And anything else I can think of that needs doing. It will be a busy weekend.



 

I have installed a WYSIWYG module in Drupal on the North Idaho Mineral Club web site. This will make it easier for others to add content to the site. It's a fairly simple-minded editor, and I may add another one that allows more to be done, such as tables. You can set Drupal up so it uses different editors under different circumstances, which is really a great option.



 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Thursday, 4 November 2010

I finished up the web pages on the North Idaho Mineral Club web site. I will still be adding content, but all the pages laid out in my original menu system now have text. And some pictures, too.

I have been snagging hints and tips and how-tos from the monthly newsletters, and I haven't finished doing that yet. Other than that, the Join page needs a membership form.



 

I have never believed that politicians were big on logic, but they are really overdoing it this time. I would like to see how they got from 'the public has no confidence in how the party in power is handling the recession' to 'the country has spoken, so we will repeal all health care laws initiated by the party in power'. Not that I am in favor of social medicine myself - I just want to see their logic laid down on paper. Pretty much impossible is my guess - there is NO logic there.

In 2000 and 2006 2004, 'elected by a narrow majority' became 'we have a mandate'. It happens all the time and it makes me want to puke.



 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Wednesday, 3 November 2010

While presenting my ID to vote last night, I realized that my driver's license had expired on Sunday. The first thing I will do this morning is go down to Coeur d'Alene to renew it. I wish they had sent me a notice, but that's not the way they work.



 

When I installed the Ubuntu 10.04 LTS system on this workstation, I forgot about one little thing: my remote connection to work. That requires installation of Citrix software on the workstation and a security certificate.

I attempted to connect remotely and failed, so I downloaded and installed the Citrix software. I could not install the security certificate, because Firefox thought it was already installed. I fooled around with it, but the bottom line is that I can't use Citrix to connect to work because the certificate is not trusted. I have tried everything I can think of to change that, but nothing seems to work.



 

Congratulations, winners. The inmates are still in charge of the asylum, although in many cases, it's different inmates than before.



 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Tuesday, 2 November 2010

One of my friends who reads this blog has suggested that I take a close look at Linux Mint as a replacement for Ubuntu. I must confess I never considered that, since I know that their menu system is a clone of the current Windows menu system, which is torturous and takes way more mouse clicks to use than the normal Gnome menu system. With a bit of research I discovered that their fancy menu can be removed and the old Gnome menu can be installed, so I downloaded an ISO of Linux Mint 9. I will be looking at it closely to see if it meets my needs.



 

I am building another workbench for my garage. It's going to be a really good one. I got the instructions and materials list from a YouTube video. I am almost finished with it, after an hour's work. I need the workbench for my rock saws, as their present benches are unstable.



 

Don't forget to vote today. Every vote is important. And remember, "Insanity is electing the same people from the same political parties over and over again and expecting different results." Of course, insanity is also following the crowd, but don't let that dissuade you.



 

Once your rights have been taken from you, has there ever been a case where they were given back?



 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News

Monday, 1 November 2010

When I power up this workstation, one of the things that happens is there is a check for software updates. If there are any, the Update Manager pops up. Last week, a new pop up dialog began displaying before the Update Manager popped up: it notified me that my Ubuntu 9.04 workstation would no longer receive critical security updates, as it was too old (a year and a half is too old?) This did nothing for me except piss me off; why was Canonical acting like Microsoft, Oracle and Apache?

Since I am not yet ready to switch to another distribution, I decided to install Ubuntu 10.04, which is a long term support version. To that end, I installed 10.04 on this workstation. It is a fairly straightforward process, but for the benefit of those who haven't done it, I will detail the steps below. Please note that I always do a fresh install instead of an upgrade, as upgrades always seem to cause problems.

Installation

  1. If your home directory is in the same partition as the root directory, you should back up that directory to another disk. My home directory is a separate partition. By being in a separate partition, you can install a new operating system without wiping out all your data. On second thought, you should always back up your home directory just to be safe.
  2. Open up your applications menu and go through it, line by line. Write down any applications you have installed that are not a part of the normal Ubuntu installation. For instance, some of the applications I wrote down were
    • Galculator - I like reverse-polish calculators.
    • GIMP - Ubuntu no longer has this in their default install.
    • Filezilla - My ftp client of choice
    • Thunderbird - My email client of choice
    • Tellico - I keep track of my audio and video collections with this.
    • Lazarus - To compile gdvdslides
    • Quanta Plus - My HTML editor of choice.
    • VLC - My multimedia player of choice. This should be the default in Ubuntu, but it isn't, for some reason.
    • VirtuaBox - So I can work on the soccer program in a Windows 2000 virtual machine.
  3. Use gparted or some other tool to get a list of what physical partition is used by what operating system directory. If worse comes to the worst, you can just list the fstab with 'cat /etc/fstab'. Here is the list of my partitions.
    • sda1 - / (root directory)
    • sda2 - swap
    • sda5 - /usr
    • sda6 - /var
    • sda7 - /home
  4. Reboot the workstation with the Ubuntu 10.04 disk in the CD drive, so the live Linux system boots instead of the one currently on your hard disk. I clicked the Install Ubuntu to begin the installation.
  5. When the hard disk partitioning screen appears, I chose the manual partitioning method. I then selected each of the partitions listed in step 3 and set them to each of the directories from step 3. I chose to format each of the partitions as an ext4 partition, EXCEPT sda7 (the home partition), which MUST NOT BE FORMATTED. That one is where your home partition is. Continue with the install screens.
  6. I chose the same user name as last time, so my old home directory would automatically be recognized.
  7. When all the installation screens are gotten through, the last one will be to actually do the installation. At that point, I double-checked to make sure I wasn't going to format the home partition, then kept going.
  8. When the installation was complete, I restarted the computer.

Post-Installation

  1. The first thing I do after installing a new operating system version is to check for hardware drivers. In this case I installed the nVidia driver so I can use both monitors on my workstation correctly.
  2. Update all the installed packages using the Update Manager. The 10.04 system disk was created back in April, so there are probably a lot of packages to update. There were in my case.
  3. I brought up the Nautilus file manager and clicked in the View menu to display hidden files and folders, then went through my home directory and weeded out a raft of old hidden folders and directories. You should be very careful when doing this, as deleting the wrong folders or files could be disastrous. For instance, I left the .thunderbird directory alone, as I did not want to wipe out all my email. When in doubt do not delete.
  4. Bring up the Synaptic Package Manager and search for each application on your list. Click install for the application, then check it off your list. If you can't find an application in the repositories, then you probably got it off the Internet and you will have to go hunt it down. Click Apply when you have all the applications marked for installation.
  5. Use your browser to search for the unchecked applications on your list. Download and install them.
  6. I use a program called Ubuntu Tweak to help me configure the system at the end. It is in the repositories.
  7. Since I had a lot of applications to install, this process took several hours on Friday. It was a good thing I took Friday off.

That's basically the process I used to get this workstation upgraded to Ubuntu 10.04. Since 10.04 is a Long Term Support version, I will be good for security updates for the next 5 years.



 

At the last North Idaho Mineral Club meeting, I got many field trip pictures from Bill Johnson. Spent a good deal of time on Friday and Saturday reducing them to 1280 X 960, uploading them to the web site and putting them in photo galleries. Check out the results if you get a chance.



 

Silly sign of the day:


 

Free/Open Source Software

 

"It's Mine, and You Have to Pay (and Pay and Pay) For It"

 

Local and Other News